Snowdon

Snowdon1085 metres or 3559 feet makes Snowdon or Yr Wyddfa the highest mountain in Wales and England. Thousands of people are drawn each year to this majestic mountain and ascend to its summit either by train, by foot or by mountain bike.

By Train

The Snowdon Mountain Railway operates the train which runs on the rack and pinion track all the way to the summit. The service runs typically from the middle of March to the end of October weather permitting. In peak periods the trains are very busy; it is advisable to book in advance. See their website for more information.

By foot

Ascending Snowdon by foot is a fantastic achievement for anyone but requires a bit of planning and common sense. Please remember that the weather can change dramatically in a short space of time. Make sure you are properly equipped and suitably skilled to keep yourself safe; always make sure someone knows where you are going and what time you expect to return.

There are 6 routes up Snowdon and this link http://www.visitsnowdonia.info/snowdon_walks_-_6_routes-95.aspx
is a useful resource to help you plan your day. It includes safety tips, historical narrative, information about parking and the Sherpa bus and sketch diagrams of the various paths. The Llanberis Path, 5 miles each way, starts in village at the far end of Victoria Terrace.
The Sherpa bus takes you to Pen y Pass to the start of the Pyg and Miners Path. (Don’t take the car you won’t get in the car park). It is a very reliable and frequent service, £2 for a single trip £5 for a day ticket. See www.gwynedd.gov.uk/timetables

A quieter walk is to take Capel Coch Road off the High Street by The Outdoor Shop, walk steeply uphill passed the Youth Hostel, then follow the track up Bwlch Maesgwm also known locally as Telegraph Valley, this will lead you to the Snowdon Ranger Path. It’s a longer walk than the Llanberis Path but is much less popular.
Make sure you check the weather forecast before you leave, www.mwis.org.uk/english-welsh-forecast/SD/ Take enough clothing, waterproofs, hats and gloves and layers of clothing so you can take them off and on as needed. Suitable footwear is essential with a good tread pattern.
Take plenty of food and drink – even on cold days you need to drink fluids and water is best. You can get dehydrated very quickly when walking and you then perform less well. Food keeps you supplied with energy, little and often is good advice to keep your energy level up.
Know your limits – if you can’t use a map and compass you may get caught out if the weather closes in. Turn round in plenty of time; the mountains will be there another day.
Advice is readily available in all the local climbing and outdoor shops, their staff spend a lot of time on the mountains.

By Bike

Mountain biking down Snowdon is an experience not to be missed but don’t underestimate the seriousness of the challenge.
The two paths to use are the Llanberis path and the Snowdon Ranger. You need to be a competent and experienced rider. The difficulty of these rides being black and double black respectively. (If you don’t know what this means, are you ready to ride the mountain?)
Both paths are subject to a voluntary riding ban from 10am to 5pm from the beginning of May to the end of September. It’s a great way to spend a summer evening and there is nothing to stop you taking your bike before 5pm as long as you are not riding up.
Following the voluntary ban makes sense as riding is far more hazardous without lots of walkers on the path. Cyclists (under the Countryside Act 1968) are required to give way to pedestrians and equine users at all times.

© 2018 Llanberis Development Group - Website by Delwedd

Photo credits: Thank you to Paul Sivyer , Mireille Charnock, Emlyn Baylis, Hefin Owen & Dylan Cadwalider Parry